"Not all of his cast appears in every time period, but the three women at the center all give strong, interesting performances from better-than-usual material. Ashley Rickards, for instance, gets to do a lot more than just be irresponsible and then inscrutably creepy (her character’s usual arc); the flashbacks show a great arc of uncertainty and regret and general breakdown. Catalina Sandino Moreno always adds a little more to Leigh than just what’s in her words; for a fairly plain-spoken character, she winds up with a lot of nuance. Naya Rivera initially seems to have the simplest character in Vera but winds up with some great moments as the film goes on.

They’re good enough to make the end more satisfying than it initially appears after things have sunken in a bit, even if the movie does occasionally seem to be setting up something a little more grandiose"

EFilmCritic.com’s review of At the Devil’s Door

Alex Newell talking about Naya and Ryan

"Supporting the scares is a strong cast, the standout being Naya Rivera as Vera, the younger sister who refuses to start a family or get married, much to the disappointment of older sister Leigh who is incapable of bearing children. Rivera offers the most natural performance in the film, a young woman whose ideal vision of her own future is turned upside down when satanic forces take a keen interest in her family.

That last point about Vera being forced to abandon her preferred marriage-free and child-free lifestyle choice is both part of the film’s strength and weakness. On the one hand it makes her a more interesting character and allows for actress Naya Rivera to sink her teeth into a meaty role."

Sound on Sight’s review of At the Devil’s Door

+ 
x

x

x
+ x
x